Road Trip!

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Our Next Generation Math and Science projects are going on the road. Catch presentations March 2 – 6 at the SITE Conference in Las Vegas, NV; March 9 – 13 at SXSWEdu in Austin, TX; March 30 – April 2 at the National Head Start Conference in Washington, D.C.

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Then it’s April 17 – 18 at the National Math Festival in Washington, D.C. and with our Finnish partners April 20 – 22 at the Cicero Learning Conference in Stanford, CA.

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Designing Media for Underserved Families

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Christine and Bill were delighted to join a small group from Google, Sesame Workshop, Northwestern University, EDC, SRI, KQED and others for a one-day workshop at Stanford University’s d.school. This was the second of two workshops designed to develop capacity for future interdisciplinary collaborations among researchers, educators, designers, and industry professionals who are interested in how digital media can contribute positively to children’s learning and development.

Parent’s Choice Gold in TV Category for Ruff

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The review says:

PBS Kids has launched Ruff Ruffman: Humble Media Genius, a digital literacy project aimed at kids ages 6 – 11. According to the PBS website, these video shorts explore “the constantly changing world of media, and how kids use technology, to help families become more media literate.”

Ruff Ruffman is the top-dog in this series, providing tips accompanied by spare (and delightfully quirky) animation. Also according to the website, the series developers surveyed more than 4,000 children and 250 parents to come up with the questions that are the basis of Ruff Ruffman’s Q&A show format.

How much time should I spend on the computer? How do you know if a web site is safe? Can hackers get on your texting conversations? Is searching for web sites bad for kids? Ruff, do you have a girlfriend?

Okay, some of those questions are played for comic relief but they’re handled quickly and don’t overshadow the real point of the program-which is to help kids navigate potholes and even outright dangers when using new communications technology.

Even very young kids these days are likely to consume some sort of new media and use digital and mobile technologies for school and personal purposes – and corny, wacky Ruff Ruffman delivers clear and age-appropriate technology tips, often reminding kids to ask grown-ups for help on more complex tasks, such as setting up search engines with kid-friendly filters.

These video tips are just the right length, and pear-shaped Ruff is just the right messenger, to deliver the invaluable information. Parents hoping to teach kids about media literacy and set safe and acceptable limits on media consumption would do well to let Ruff Ruffman launch the conversation. His “humility” is questionable but his advice is top-notch.

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Can you spare five seconds for a quick vote?

publicvotingWe’re finalists in the MacArthur Foundation‘s prestigious Trust Challenge. If funded we will win a grant to add an innovative, crowdsourced parent’s guide to media and technology to our Ruff Ruffman project.

A strong People’s Vote will help us. Just go to this page and click on the heart.

That’s it: no login, no fuss, no muss. It will look like this:

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For more about what we hope to make:

In today’s media-saturated world, parents of young children often struggle to navigate an overwhelming torrent of media consumption and new technologies. To cut through the noise, WGBH will create a dynamic, online resource addressing parents’ biggest questions. We will convene a community of media experts at WGBH, peer networks of tech-savvy parents via GeekDad.com and GeekMom.com, and academic expertise from the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. This unusual alliance will provide crowdsourced, curated responses to parents’ most pressing media-and-technology questions. 

Thank you!